Overview
Sever?s Disease is one of the most common overuse injuries affecting children during their secondary growth spurts and is described as a Dental Radiographs|Intraoral X-Rays|Extraoral X-Rays self-limiting condition resolving naturally with skeletal maturity 1. It is suggested to be caused by progressive microtrauma to the bone-cartilage interface in the calcaneal apophysis partly due to large traction forces in the Achilles tendon. The current standard treatment consists mainly of rest, and waiting for skeletal maturity.

Causes
At birth, most of our foot bones are still made of cartilage, which ossifies (becomes bony) over the first few years of life. At the back of the heel, there is a growth plate that is attached to the main body of the heel bone by a cartilaginous join. At about the age of 14-15 years, this area of cartilage between the growth plate and the heel bone ossifies, fusing the area to the heel. Sever?s disease occurs when there is too much motion or strain across the growth plate, resulting in this area becoming inflamed and painful.

Symptoms
Most children with Sever's complain of pain in the heel that occurs during or after activity (typically running or jumping) and is usually relieved by rest. The pain may be worse when wearing cleats. Sixty percent of children's with Sever's report experiencing pain in both heels.

Diagnosis
Physical examination varies depending on the severity and length of involvement. Bilateral involvement is present in approximately 60% of cases. Most patients experience pain with deep palpation at the Achilles insertion and pain when performing active toe raises. Forced dorsiflexion of the ankle also proves uncomfortable and is relieved with passive equinus positioning. Swelling may be present but usually is mild. In long-standing cases, the child may have calcaneal enlargement.

Non Surgical Treatment
Initially, Sever?s Disease is treated with rest, anti-inflammatory medication and softer shoes. Ice followed by heat is a common practice and heel cup orthotics have worked wonders for our young patients in the past. It can take anywhere from a few weeks to a year for these growth plates to naturally close - at which point Sever?s Disease disappears. Even though the condition does heal on its own, athletes are encouraged to seek treatment, rather than push through the pain. Simply ?dealing with it? and continuing to play sports despite the injury could lead to an impaired gait, a strained hip or a knee injury. Stretches to strengthen the leg muscles, leg compression wraps and over-the-counter acetaminophen or ibuprofen are also recommended treatments. In very rare cases, a podiatrist may recommend wearing a cast for two to twelve weeks.

Recovery
The condition is normally self-limiting, and a return to normal activities is usually possible after a period of 2-3 months. In one study, all the patients treated with a physiotherapy programme (above) improved and could return to their sport of choice after two months of treatment. The condition may recur, although recurrence was uncommon, according to one study.
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نوشته شده توسط Vito Schell در جمعه 26 خرداد 1396 و ساعت 21:11
Overview
plantar neuromaMorton's neuroma is an inflammation of the nerves in the foot that go to the toes. Although the name includes the word ?neuroma,? it is not really a tumor. It can affect any of the toes in the foot. However, it most often affects the nerves that run between the third and fourth, or second and third toes.

Causes
When a nerve is pinched between bones, the result is swelling of the nerve. It is this swelling which is referred to as a Neuroma. When the condition occurs in the foot, it is known as a Morton?s Neuroma. Morton?s Neuroma is technically not a tumor. Rather, it is a thickening of the tissue that surrounds the digital nerves leading to the toes. These nerves allow for physical sensation on the skin of the toes. The region of inflammation is found where the digital nerve passes under the ligament connecting the toe bones (metatarsals) in the forefoot. Morton?s Neuroma commonly develops between the third and fourth toes, generally as a result of ongoing irritation, trauma or excessive pressure. In some cases, the second and third toes are involved. Morton?s Neuroma is confined to one foot in most cases, though it can occur in both, particularly in athletes such as runners.

Symptoms
Typically, there's no outward sign of this condition, such as a lump. Instead, you may experience the following symptoms. A feeling as if you're standing on a pebble in your shoe. A burning pain in the ball of your foot that may radiate into your toes. Tingling or numbness in your toes. It's best not to ignore any foot pain Dental Radiographs|Intraoral X-Rays|Extraoral X-Rays that lasts longer than a few days. See your doctor if you experience a burning pain in the ball of your foot that's not improving, despite changing your footwear and modifying activities that may cause stress to your foot.

Diagnosis
Patients with classic Morton?s neuroma symptoms will have pain with pressure at the base of the involved toes (either between the 2nd and 3rd toes, or between the 3rd and 4th toes). In addition, squeezing the front of the foot together can exacerbate symptoms. As well, they may have numbness on the sides of one toe and the adjacent toe, as this corresponds with the distribution of the involved nerve.

Non Surgical Treatment
Wear shoes with plenty of room for the toes to move, low heels, and laces or buckles that allow for width adjustment. Wear shoes with thick, shock-absorbent soles, as well as proper insoles that are designed to keep excessive pressure off of the foot. High-heeled shoes over two inches tall should be avoided whenever possible because they place undue strain on the forefoot. Resting the foot and massaging the affected area can temporarily alleviate neuroma pain. Use an ice pack to help to dull the pain and improve comfort. Use over-the-counter shoe pads. These pads can relieve pressure around the affected area.plantar neuroma

Surgical Treatment
If these non-surgical measures do not work, surgery is sometimes needed. Surgery normally involves a small incision (cut) being made on either the top, or the sole, of the foot between the affected toes. Usually, the surgeon will then either create more space around the affected nerve (known as nerve decompression) or will cut out (resect) the affected nerve. If the nerve is resected, there will be some permanent numbness of the skin between the affected toes. This does not usually cause any problems. You will usually have to wear a special shoe for a short time after surgery until the wound has healed and normal footwear can be used again. Surgery is usually successful. However, as with any surgical operation, there is a risk of complications. For example, after this operation a small number of people can develop a wound infection. Another complication may be long-term thickening of the skin (callus formation) on the sole of the foot (known as plantar keratosis). This may require treatment by a specialist in care of the feet (chiropody).
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نوشته شده توسط Vito Schell در جمعه 26 خرداد 1396 و ساعت 21:07
Overview
Pes Cavus is a term used to describe a foot with an arch that is too high. A high-arched foot is painful because additional stress is placed on unnatural places on the foot. This type of foot typically requires therapeutic footwear that can be modified to accommodate the arch.

Causes
Among the cases of neuromuscular pes cavus, 50% have been attributed to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, which is the most common type of inherited neuropathy with an incidence of 1 per 2,500 persons affected. Also known as Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy (HMSN), it is genetically heterogeneous and usually presents in the first decade of life with delayed motor milestones, distal muscle weakness, clumsiness and frequent falls. By adulthood, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease can cause painful foot deformities such as pes cavus. Although it is a relatively common disorder affecting the foot and ankle, little is known about the distribution of muscle weakness, severity of orthopaedic deformities, or types of foot pain experienced. There are no cures or effective treatment to halt the progression of any form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.Pes Cavus

Symptoms
Difficulty finding proper fitting footwear because the shoes are not deep enough Dental Radiographs|Intraoral X-Rays|Extraoral X-Rays due to high arch and the clawed toes. Shortened foot length. Foot pain with walking, standing, and running. Metatarsalgia with pain in the forefoot/ ball of the foot (usually 1st and 5th metatarsal heads), with or without calluses/corns. Pain and stiffness of the medial arch or anywhere along the mid-portion of the foot. Morton's neuroma with pain in the ball of the foot and lesser toes. Pain in the heel and sole of the foot from plantar fasciitis. Stress fractures of the metatarsals and other foot bones. Particularly in diabetics and those with compromised circulation, abnormal pressure may result in chromic ulcers of the heel and ball of the foot. Strain and early degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis) of lower extremity joints. ?Pump bumps" (Haglund's deformity) on the back of the heel. Associated discomfort within and near the ankle joint. Ankle instability with frequent sprains. Tight Achilles tendons. The knees, hips, and lower back may be the primary source of discomfort. Chronic lower extremity pain my lead to inactivity and diminished well-being.

Diagnosis
The diagnosis of symptoms occurs through conducting a history and physical in combination with diagnostic testing. A history of familial high arches and any muscular dystrophy type symptoms in the family are important to consider. The type of pain and what causes the pain to begin are also important to consider. For example, patients who have pain with walking in comparison to only having pain when running may need more aggressive treatment than patients who only have pain with high impact exercises.

Non Surgical Treatment
Conservative care is highly successful in the cavus high arch foot. An orthotic with a high lateral heel flange, a valgus post and a sub-first metatarsal cutout can balance the foot. Often, the first ray is plantarflexed and a cutout of the first metatarsal head is essential for forefoot balancing. In severe ankle instability cases, an over the counter ankle-foot orthotic or a custom ankle-foot orthotic can be beneficial in balancing the foot and ankle. Consideration of a first ray cutout should also be part of the bracing process.

Surgical Treatment
In patients with inflexibility, arthrodesis sacrifices little, and relieves joint pain. The foot can be re-orientated by excising wedge shaped portions of the joints. The triple arthrodesis of subtalar, talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints is very commonly used. Midfoot arthrodeses may be more appropriate, depending on the maximum site of pain and deformity.Supinated Foot
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نوشته شده توسط Vito Schell در جمعه 26 خرداد 1396 و ساعت 20:56
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